In its June survey, the Public Opinion Research Centre investigated the attitudes of respondents towards political parties and their role in society. The survey included two extensive aggregates of statements and those polled were asked to express their approval or disapproval with each one of them. Further two questions dealt with the issue of internal plurality within political parties. The comparison of the results obtained reveals a certain discrepancy in public opinions: on the one hand, the majority of respondents (67%) think that divergence of opinions should not occur within parties, but on the other hand most respondents (59%) are also persuaded that members of parliament should vote according to their own opinion and not according to what has been agreed within the party.

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Compared to the results obtained a month ago, the preferences of the ODS fell slightly during June, in spite of which the party remains in the lead, keeping a comfortable margin. As regards the KSCM, the party suffered a considerable drop in preferences. None of the political parties recorded a major increase in popularity and there are now more people who would not participate in an election and could not choose a political party.

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All respondents having the right to vote were traditionally asked an open question (i.e. without a list of political parties being used) investigating which party they would vote for if an election to the Chamber of Deputies took place the following week. The structure of the answers given is summarised in the table. The question ‘Imagine that an election to the Chamber of Deputies is held next week.

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All respondents having the right to vote were traditionally asked an open question (i.e. without a list of political parties being used) investigating which party they would vote for if an election to the Chamber of Deputies took place the following week. The structure of the answers given is summarised in the table.

The question ‘Imagine that an election to the Chamber of Deputies is held next week.

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All respondents having the right to vote were traditionally asked an open question (i.e. without a list of political parties being used) investigating which party they would vote for if an election to the Chamber of Deputies took place the following week. The structure of the answers given is summarised in the table.

The question ‘Imagine that an election to the Chamber of Deputies is held next week.

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The respondents almost universally agree that they choose a certain party because they identify with its programme (91%), with the party ideology (89%) and because they place trust in the party leaders (88%). There is slightly less broad consensus about the importance of existing activities of the party (78%). Two fifths of supporters of political parties say that their preferences are influenced by the political orientation of their family.

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All respondents having the right to vote were traditionally asked an open question (i.e. without a list of political parties being used) investigating which party they would vote for if an election to the Chamber of Deputies took place the following week. The structure of the answers given is summarised in the table.

The question ‘Imagine that an election to the Chamber of Deputies is held next week.

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All respondents having the right to vote were traditionally asked an open question (i.e. without a list of political parties being used) investigating which party they would vote for if an election to the Chamber of Deputies took place the following week. The structure of the answers given is summarised in the table.

The question ‘Imagine that an election to the Chamber of Deputies is held next week.

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The Public Opinion Research Centre was investigating the decision-making of the electorate throughout the ‘super election’ year 2002. With the benefit of hindsight, we would like to compare how voters made their decisions prior to the June election to the Chamber of Deputies and the autumn elections to the Senate and municipalities. At which stage of the election campaigns did voters decide whom to vote for? Do they decide in the last minute or do they know well in advance whom to support? In the event of elections to the Senate and municipalities, decisions on who will get my vote are made significantly later than in elections to the Chamber of Deputies.

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For the third time this year, we asked respondents to evaluate the performance of individual parties in the Chamber of Deputies. The best assessment is given to the CSSD (viewed positively by 55% of respondents), whereas the worst to the KSCM and the US-DEU (viewed positively by only 24% of respondents). Comparing the current results with the findings of the May survey, we can clearly see that there are fewer positive and concurrently more negative assessments of the US-DEU and the ODS.

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